Environmental Science Division (EVS)a Division of Argonne National Laboratory

A new Earth modeling system, the Energy Exascale Earth System Model (E3SM), features enough detail to capture fronts, storms, and hurricanes

August 21, 2018

The Earth — comprised of numerous shifting atmospheric, oceanic, land and ice components — presents an extraordinarily complex system to simulate using computer models.

But a new Earth modeling system, the Energy Exascale Earth System Model (E3SM), is now able to capture and simulate all these components in one program. Released on April 23, after four years of development, E3SM features enhanced weather-scale resolution — i.e., enough detail to capture fronts, storms and hurricanes — and uses advanced computers to more reliably predict Earth's climate variability. The system helps researchers anticipate decadal-scale changes that could influence the U.S. energy sector in years to come.

The E3SM project is supported by DOE's Office of Biological and Environmental Research. “One of E3SM's purposes is to help ensure that DOE's climate mission can be met — including on future exascale systems,” said Robert Jacob, a computational climate scientist in EVS and one of 15 project co-leaders.

Researchers in EVS hope that E3SM will support simulating five years of the Earth system within one computing day at its highest possible resolution by 2021.

Read the full article by Argonne's Andrea Manning.

Argonne scientists helped create a comprehensive new model that draws on supercomputers to simulate how various aspects of the Earth — its atmosphere, oceans, land, ice — move.
Argonne scientists helped create a comprehensive new model that draws on supercomputers to simulate how various aspects of the Earth — its atmosphere, oceans, land, ice — move. [Source: E3SM.org]
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