Environmental Science Division (EVS)a Division of Argonne National Laboratory
Predictive environmental understanding

EVS scientists advance global climate models by embarking on two new field campaigns

December 22, 2021

Scientists from DOE's Argonne National Laboratory, and from laboratories and universities across the country, use ARM to obtain data to better represent climate-related processes in global-scale models. Through two new field campaigns — Surface Atmosphere Integrated Field Laboratory (SAIL) and Tracking Aerosol Convection Interactions ExpeRiment (TRACER) — EVS researchers will work with multidisciplinary teams to gather data on key climate-related processes such as precipitation, cloud formation and aerosols interactions.

“These insights will serve to enhance our basic understanding of climate and be used to improve the accuracy of climate and weather models and simulations,” said EVS atmospheric scientist Scott Collis, a co-investigator in both campaigns.

SAIL will deploy more than four dozen instruments across the East River Watershed in Crested Butte, Colorado. The region includes portions of the Rocky Mountains and tributaries that drain into the Colorado River, which supports over 40 million people.

Clouds play an important role in Earth's climate system. Through the TRACER campaign, scientists will have a chance to look at how aerosols impact their life cycle. Aerosols are liquid and solid particles tiny enough to be suspended in air. The condensation of moisture on these particles contributes to the formation of clouds.

Read the full article by Joan Koka.

Stream near Crested Butte, Colorado. Crested Butte is where the two-year ARM SAIL campaign will take place.
Stream near Crested Butte, Colorado. Crested Butte is where the two-year ARM SAIL campaign will take place. [Source: Adam Springer/Shuttterstock]
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